WACAC Talk: "Why a 5.0 GPA, 36 ACT, and 2400 SAT are pretty much worthless... without a sense of self"

One of our students was crippled by anxiety when facing the ACT.  We asked her to find an image that encapsulated how the test, and the college admissions process, made her feel. She gave us the image above.  

One of our students was crippled by anxiety when facing the ACT.  We asked her to find an image that encapsulated how the test, and the college admissions process, made her feel. She gave us the image above.  

Nick Standlea, President of Test Prep Gurus, will be speaking with Jason Gregory, Dean of Student Life at Sonoma Academy, at the Western Association for College Admission Counseling annual conference in Reno.

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015, Session G: 9:00 am - 10:00 pm.

"Why a 5.0 GPA, 36 ACT and 2400 SAT are pretty much worthless... without a sense of self"

The latest research in positive psychology and education is demonstrating that there are a number of ways that educators can lower the pressure placed on students in the college admissions process, while simultaneously improving their students' competitive positions when applying to selective colleges.  

The panel will discuss how growth mindset, learned optimism, mindfulness, selective attention, and grit can not only increase students' enjoyment of school, but also push them to develop a stronger sense of self.  This increased interpersonal knowledge gives meaning to the test prep process, results in higher standardized test scores, and acts as a catalyst to identify right-fit colleges and to craft college applications that stand out from the pack with a clear point of view and an authentic voice.  

This discussion will also touch on innovative exercises and tools for counselor/advisory-student workshops. For example, articulating a "coherent personal narrative" in 1-3 images in order to craft stronger college applications and essays that break the generic mold and more effectively communicate who a student is and what they have to offer to the communities of their right-fit colleges.